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Technology leaders are increasingly aware that many organizations, including those with some of the most demanding workloads, have made the switch to Linux due to its flexibility, reliability and lower costs. The New York Stock Exchange, Google, Amazon.com and Facebook are just a few examples of companies that have successfully moved from UNIX to Linux across their organizations.

While Linux is considered "UNIX-like" and it is generally accepted that IT professionals well-versed in UNIX can leverage their skills with Linux, organizations moving to Linux often have questions on how implementation strategies differ between the two environments. One common question for many making the switch is the difference in scale. How do organizations deal with commodity hardware vs. big iron? How are systems managed as their numbers increase by orders of magnitude?

This free Linux training webinar is designed to provide you with insights on best practices when moving to a Linux environment. We'll demonstrate how high availability is provided in software vs. hardware and will also examine solutions for automated deployment and software life-cycle management and how you can leverage cloud computing tools.

You'll learn best practices, tools and concepts for moving to commodity hardware with Linux, including:

  • Examining the available software projects for Linux
  • Automated provisioning for large scale out deployments
  • System life-cycle management best practices
  • Working with Linux vendors and the Linux community to support mission critical applications

About Joe Royall

thumb royallJoe Royall has 18 years experience with Linux and Unix systems engineering, product development and organizational leadership. Early in his career, he worked as a senior system administrator and manager at AT&T and Lucent. Joe has provided consulting for Fortune 500 in Unix to Linux migrations, automated deployment, provisioning, identity management and high availability. As a Linux instructor, Joe has taught cloud, storage, clustering, provisioning, Linux administration and performance tuning for the Linux Foundation, Cloudera, Red Hat and others..

About Linux Foundation Linux Training

The Linux Foundation offers comprehensive Linux training for developers and system administrators who want to learn from the best. The Linux Foundation offers Linux training courses online, in person at training centers around the world, at Linux Foundation events or in your office. The Linux Foundation also offers custom linux training for companies who want to bring the experts to you. Please contact the Linux training team to learn more about our custom Linux training solutions. 

Linux has continuously grown in the embedded systems market for over a decade, gaining market share from proprietary operating systems. The proliferation of embedded devices, the explosion of open source development, the inherent hardware support, the incredible networking capabilities and the royalty-free economic model have all helped propel use of the Linux kernel into one of the best choices for the design of new embedded systems.

While the success of Linux in the embedded market can not be denied, its notoriety was once confined to mostly technical professionals. That changed in 2008 with Google's release of the Android mobile phone operating system, based on the Linux kernel. Thus began the tremendous growth of Linux in the consumer world, with over one million Android devices being activated every day in 2012 and predictions of total Android devices shipped reaching one billion in 2013.

In this webinar, Benjamin Zores, Android Platform Architect and Technical Writer, will show embedded systems engineers and engineering leaders how the Android operating system compares to traditional embedded Linux systems.  We'll help you understand whether or not you should start your next product design with Android through an exhaustive introduction to:

  • Android operating system internals
  • Android's complete divergence with embedded Linux systems design
  • The reasons for Android's attraction in the industry
  • Android's under-the-hood flaws and weaknesses

 

About Benjamin Zores

Benjamin ZoresAs a software architect for Alcatel-Lucent, Benjamin Zores has been designing embedded Linux devices for 10+ years, leading enterprise-grade Linux/Android multimedia IP phones conception. His area of expertise mostly covers low-level devices and platforms definition, board bring-up and drivers development, though his real passion comes from reverse-engineering the software architecture of operating systems to understand what’s beneath the hood. He drove the conception of an Android- based wired IP phone and has a very deep knowledge of bringing support for all multimedia peripherals and connectivity layers of Android. Prior from that, Ben was also most known for his open source contributions, as the original author of the OpenBricks embedded cross-build framework, the GeeXboX HTPC live distribution and the uShare UPnP/DLNA MediaServer. Ben is also a recurrent speaker at LinuxFoundation’s ELC and ABS events and Android technical writer for Linux Magazine France. He lives in Strasbourg, France.

About Linux Foundation Linux Training

The Linux Foundation offers comprehensive Linux training for developers and system administrators who want to learn from the best. The Linux Foundation offers Linux training courses online, in person at training centers around the world, at Linux Foundation events or in your office. The Linux Foundation also offers custom linux training for companies who want to bring the experts to you. Please contact the Linux training team to learn more about our custom Linux training solutions. 

Installing Linux for Linux Foundation Classes

Installing Virtual Machine Images run under a Hypervisor

We can provide pre-built virtual machine images that work with VMware hypervisors, Oracle Virtual Box, or KVM. The host machine can be running any operating system with an available hypervisor, including all flavors of Windows, Linux and Mac. 

Once you have the hypervisor installed, the actual installation time for a virtual machine is basically zero since all you have to do is attach our image file to it. These pre-built images already contain all the needed software and for the kernel-level classes, also conveniently contain a copy of the Linux kernel source git repository. The virtual machine images are updated with each new kernel release, which occurs every three months or so.

An advantage of using the virtual machine images is that you can't fundamentally destroy your system while running them, and they run as an unprivileged application and will get you into less trouble with IT staff if that is an issue. A further advantage, especially with on-line classes, is that a system failure does not take you off-line from the virtual class.

The disadvantages have mostly to do with performance and requiring somewhat more memory and CPU power. However, in most (but not all) classes this is not a disqualifying aspect. 

Upon enrollment in a class we can make these virtual machine images available to you. (We don't make them available to the general public as they are quite large – 2+ GB even in compressed form – and we don't have the dedicated bandwidth to support widespread downloading.)

Performing a Native Linux Installation

Virtually all popular Linux distributions have straightforward installation instructions these days, and most provide a "live" CD or USB stick which can also be used to do an install. One first boots off the Live media; a successful boot verifies that the Linux distribution is out-of-the-box compatible with your hardware, and you can then click on install to place the Linux distribution on your hard disk. (Using "Wubi" to install Ubuntu from within Windows does not count as a native installation. Performance is worse than using a virtual machine as discussed above and we do not support this option.

In order to proceed with installation, you generally need enough available space on the hard disk. Furthermore, free disk space may not be sufficient, as it has to be in either unallocated free space outside of any existing partition, or partitions must be available for reformatting.

This is non-trivial for most systems that have not already had multi-boot configurations setup before, and this step, which must be taken care of first, can easily be more time-consuming than the actual installation. We have seen systems which can take hours to prepare as far as the partitioning goes, but once done, installation can be performed in 20 minutes or so.

Most LiveCD/USB media contain system software to resize, move, create and delete disk partitions; most use a program called gparted. One can also download the excellent CD/USB partitioning and repair/recovery disk/USB stick called Parted Magic (http://partedmagic.com), which is particularly well suited for this task. If you are lucky you can simply use Parted Magic or gparted to "shrink" an already existing partition and free up 20-30 GB or so, then do your normal installation. Be careful during the procedure to properly answer any questions about your hard disk layout so you do not destroy previously existing in-use partitions.

However, many OEM-installed systems have already used four "primary" disk partitions; if this is the case you cannot create any new partitions. (You can have no more than four primary partitions, or up to three primary partitions plus an "extended" partition in which you can create a number of "logical" partitions.) On these brain-dead systems one usually finds two partitions reserved for Windows (a boot partition and the C: drive), one partition reserved for the recovery disk and one partition for manufacturer diagnostics. If you are stuck with this situation, you have to delete a partition to get your primaries down to three or do more complicated things such as converting one of the primary partitions to a logical one, and you will still have to do some steps of shrinking and moving partitions. 

It is impossible for us at the Linux Foundation to give detailed instructions on how to do this. Each system varies as to its pre-existing layout, and the potential for turning your system into a doorstop is quite high. We do not have the technical support bandwidth to take care of things like this. Therefore, we will simply refer you to your favored distribution and its install pages for technical assistance.

Once you have performed a successful installation, we can provide scripts (on request) for most major distributions that will install any software packages you may need for our classes. These scripts will generally bring in more software than you actually need for a given class, but the surplus of riches is not a problem.

Please note that very recent hardware may contain "UEFI Secure Boot" mechanisms on the motherboard. If this is enabled in the BIOS, the situation is more complicated and there is not a universally accepted method of making Linux co-exist with it for now. It is beyond our current ability to give technical support in this situation.

The bottom line is that unless you feel comfortable messing with your partitioning setup, have the time to deal with any potential problems, and have an available lifeline if disaster strikes, you will probably be better off doing a virtual machine installation.

As mentioned under "Installing Virtual Machine Images," once you have the hypervisor installed, the actual installation time for a virtual machine is basically zero since all you have to do is attach our image file to it.

Migrating from QNX to Embedded Linux

In recent years, many companies have moved to open source as it affords more flexibility and cost control. Many users of QNX are currently looking at Embedded Linux as an alternative embedded OS, but are unsure of how to migrate. The Linux Foundation offers resources, training and an open source build tool, the Yocto Project, to help companies make this transition. IT executives, managers, and engineers have a fiduciary duty to investigate and recommend technology alternatives for technical, legal, strategic, or financial reasons. This article discusses what these persons interested in porting QNX-based embedded systems to an Embedded Linux platform should consider.

Author: The Linux Foundation

Related Training Courses:

» LF411 Embedded Linux Development
» LF405 Building Embedded Linux with the Yocto Project
» LF404 Building Embedded Linux with the Yocto Project: Crash Course

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Linux Performance Data Collection Tips

If monitoring and optimizing the performance of your servers is critical to your business, collecting the right data to analyze is essential. The following tips were created by Linux Foundation instructor Dominic Duval, who teaches a comprehensive course on Linux Performance Tuning (LF426).

Author: The Linux Foundation

Related Training Courses:

» LF426 Linux Performance Tuning

Disclosure: The following material is an excerpt taken from our training course materials. Linux Foundation training courses can be up to five days in length and consist of in-depth training manuals and extensive lab exercises. Because the following content is just a small section of the overall training material shared in the class, some relevant topics or tools may be missing in this publication that are covered in the course.

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Selecting a Linux Training Partner

For organizations who use use Linux-based technology as a competitive differentiator, the success or failure of their business rests in the capabilities of their development teams. Despite this, most organizations underestimate the amount of training Linux developers need, the impact training can have on product quality, and the likelihood of meeting project timelines when training becomes an integral part of the strategy. Technology training is less about getting training for the particular technology you’re currently using, and more about ensuring you get the right expertise transferred to the people within your organization who will benefit the most.

Five-Step Selection Model

This document is meant to serve as a guide technology companies can use when evaluating the type of Linux training that will make the biggest impact. It will also help you to select the right Linux training partner to help meet the goals of your organization.

 

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Growth of Android in Embedded Systems

Linux has continuously grown in the embedded systems market for over a decade, gaining market share from proprietary operating systems. The proliferation of embedded devices, the explosion of open source development, the inherent hardware support, the incredible networking capabilities and the royalty-free economic model have all helped propel use of the Linux kernel into one of the best choices for the design of new embedded systems.

While the success of Linux in the embedded market can not be denied, its notoriety was once confined to mostly technical professionals. That changed in 2008 with Google’s release of the Android mobile phone operating system, based on the Linux kernel. Thus began the tremendous growth of Linux in the consumer world, with over one million Android devices being activated every day in 2012 and predictions of total Android devices shipped reaching one billion in 2013.

About Benjamin Zores

Benjamin ZoresAs a software architect for Alcatel-Lucent, Benjamin Zores has been designing embedded Linux devices for 10+ years, leading enterprise-grade Linux/Android multimedia IP phones conception. His area of expertise mostly covers low-level devices and platforms definition, board bring-up and drivers development, though his real passion comes from reverse-engineering the software architecture of operating systems to understand what’s beneath the hood. He drove the conception of an Android- based wired IP phone and has a very deep knowledge of bringing support for all multimedia peripherals and connectivity layers of Android. Prior from that, Ben was also most known for his open source contributions, as the original author of the OpenBricks embedded cross-build framework, the GeeXboX HTPC live distribution and the uShare UPnP/DLNA MediaServer. Ben is also a recurrent speaker at LinuxFoundation’s ELC and ABS events and Android technical writer for Linux Magazine France. He lives in Strasbourg, France.

Related Training Courses:

» LF308 Introduction to Embedded Android Development
» LF315 Inside Android: An Intro to Android Internals 

Download Publication:

Cross Development Environments For Embedded Linux

Those who begin building a cross development toolchain often find it a much more difficult undertaking than expected at first thought, even though the basic steps are widely available. In this publication, we discuss some of the idiosyncrasies that can make independent toolchain construction by an embedded project team challenging, some of the external resources available and how these might be evaluated with respect to your embedded project goals.

Author: The Linux Foundation

Related Training Courses:

» LF411 Embedded Linux Development
» LF405 Building Embedded Linux with the Yocto Project

Disclosure: The following material is an excerpt taken from our training course materials. Linux Foundation training courses can be up to five days in length and consist of in-depth training manuals and extensive lab exercises. Because the following content is just a small section of the overall training material shared in the class, some relevant topics or tools may be missing in this publication that are covered in the course.

 

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Introduction to Linux Security

Needless-to-say, having multiple, diverse layers of security is a good idea. It helps protect your network and systems, in the event that there is a failure in one of the layers. The diversity of the layers is also important, as you are only as strong “as your weakest link.” If you have multiple layers of the same type of security, a single bug or breach may bypass all of them at once. This Linux security publication will introduce you to the key concepts Linux system administrators need to understand and teach you best practices to keep your environment safe.

Author: The Linux Foundation

Related Training Courses:

» LF416 Linux Security

Disclosure: The following material is an excerpt taken from our training course materials. Linux Foundation training courses can be up to five days in length and consist of in-depth training manuals and extensive lab exercises. Because the following content is just a small section of the overall training material shared in the class, some relevant topics or tools may be missing in this publication that are covered in the course.

 

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How Engineering Leaders Can Use The Yocto Project to Solve Common Embedded Linux Challenges

While the products engineering teams make are vastly different, for engineering leaders, there are a core set of challenges which typically keep them awake at night.

Whether you are considering Linux-based system development for the first time, or are looking for a better approach after having learned your initial lessons, chances are that you are facing a multitude of common challenges, including:

  • Controlling your Linux operating system stack
  • Maintenance
  • Build system and tooling
  • Open source licensing requirements
  • Support
  • Ramping up and scaling your organization

In this Linux publication, we explore how the Yocto Project can help you and your engineering team get the next product development project off the ground faster and be in better position to finish it successfully, on time and within budget.

Author: Rudolf Streif, The Linux Foundation

Related Training Courses:

» LF405 Building Embedded Linux with the Yocto Project

 

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